If you’re interested in a dog for security or obedience training, the Rottweiler may be the right breed for you. With a firm hand and the right guidance, your dog will adapt quickly to training and accept you as his authority.

It’s important to get your puppy into puppy school or socialization classes from about 12 weeks so he can learn to adapt to other dogs and people and get used to the car. Rotties are strong dogs and aren’t suitable pets for the elderly or very young children.

Choosing a Rottweiler

  • Consult a Breeder Never purchase a Rottweiler from anyone other than a registered breeder even if you don’t intend to show the dog. You’ll be laying out a considerable amount of money and have a right to ask questions before making any decisions to buy. The breed is prone to hip dysphasia, a malformation of the hip joint. Ask the breeder what precautions have been taken against the disease. Contact your local dog authority for more information on reputable breeders in your area.
  • Other Pets Introduce other animals, including cats, to your Rottweiler puppy from an early age and the relationships they form should be amiable. If you plan on purchasing two dogs, don’t select puppies from the same litter. They’re bound to fight for position and the bickering could turn nasty as they get older.
  • Your Garden Rotties don’t need a large garden to exercise in but do need some outdoor space. The breed isn’t generally known for digging up the garden but digging is a natural instinct for dogs and Rotties can’t be completely excluded. If your puppy starts this annoying habit, you’ll have to address it quickly and put measures in place to stop him from digging.
  • Your Dog’s Diet Purchase a good quality dog food for your pet. Dog food that is manufactured from a poor quality meat meal and large amounts of bonemeal is sometimes high in calcium. Large breed puppies aren’t able to control the absorption of calcium effectively and too much calcium in your dog’s diet can lead to joint damage.
  • Visit the Vet Always take your dog to the vet for regular checkups. Adult Rotties can put on weight quickly and your vet will be able to monitor your pet to make sure he doesn’t pile on the pounds. If you have your dog spayed or neutered you must adjust the food portions to compensate for a change in metabolism.
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